PAKISTAN

Reading Project

Pakistan is one of the few countries where illiteracy rates are actually increasing. Government statistics show that primary school enrollment is only 66 percent, which means some 7.2 million children are not in classrooms.

The Pakistan Reading Project is a national program aimed at improving the quality of reading education in more than 23,000 public schools. It is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Under the International Rescue Committee’s purview, along with 10 local and international partners, Creative is delivering high-quality pre-service teacher education, training and professional development with an explicit focus on teaching reading. It will improve management throughout the education system through policy support and enhanced information, planning and monitoring systems.

Complementing education initiatives by the Pakistan government, USAID and other international partners, the Pakistan Reading Project will promote a culture of reading nationally by improving organizations’ abilities to promote educational research, advocacy and reform, as well as expanding the number of colleges and universities offering rigorous teacher training and specialized education degrees.

The Pakistan Reading Project will advance and develop the reading instruction skills of 94,000 teachers over the next five years and is expected to reach 3.2 million boys and girls with improved reading programs. The program will specially target underserved rural communities where access to elementary education is limited.

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Public-private partnerships boost education in Pakistan

From books and backpacks to classroom rehabilitation, private companies in Pakistan are stepping up to boost literacy and support a culture of reading across the country. Learn More...

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Mobile bus library wheels its way to rural Pakistani schools

Four buses carrying hundreds of storybooks are navigating through several districts in Pakistan, adding a new chapter of opportunity for students in hard-to-reach primary schools. Learn More...

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